Measuring light interception and canopy cover in forests undergoing restoration

Measuring light interception and canopy cover in forests undergoing restoration





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Video presented at SER2017 – VII World Conference on Ecological Restoration.
Vídeo apresentado na SER2017 – VII World Conference on Ecological Restoration.

Authors/Autores:
Marina Melo Duarte: Voice, script and production/Voz, script e produção
Vanessa Erler Sontag: Script and production/Script e produção
Eimi Aikawa: Video editing/Edição de vídeo
Sergius Gandolfi: Review/Revisão de conteúdo
Pedro Henrique Santin Brancalion: Review/Revisão de conteúdo

Abstract:
Methods for estimating light interception and canopy cover have gained increasing relevance for monitoring forest restoration, since they provide integrative overview of ecological processes like carbon uptake, competitive exclusion of ruderal species, successional development and habitat provision for wildlife. Nevertheless, commonly, instruments for measuring both of these variables are mistakenly used interchangeably. It holds true for young restoration forests, where canopy is not completely closed, thus there might be strong correlation between light interception and canopy cover. However, assuming canopy cover as a surrogate of light interception does not work for older forests with various layers of leaves within their canopies. In this video, we will present the use of commonly adopted instruments for measuring light interception and canopy cover. Ceptometer and red to far red ratio sensor are proper to measure light availability in the understory. However, both require specific times of the day and weather conditions to work. Moreover, ceptometer needs paired sensors for its measurements. Densitometer and hemispheric cameras measure canopy cover. The former is less expensive and does not require specific weather conditions, however it is somehow subjective and demands longer time in the field. The latter does not require much field work, but demands processing time and does not work well under direct sunlight. We expect to didactically expose those methods and the proper weather conditions to use them, in order to help whoever needs to make a decision about which to use for measuring light interception and canopy cover in forests undergoing restoration.

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